Home Inspection Tip 2 – Checking the Interior of A Home

You should know the basics of screening out the wrong houses. Some inspectors are not as meticulous as you would like them to be. So here are some pointers in checking the structure of the interior of a house that you want to purchase so you will get the best deal at house closing:

– Having entrance foyer in a home is desirable as it helps in conserving heat in winter and coolness in summer days. Having a large closet near the doorway is great.

– The kitchen should be located near the dining area, living room and the garage. Also, see to it that there are lots of storage space and area for a dining nook. The counter length should be at least two feet. The exhaust fan should be placed above the stove. The stove, refrigerator, and sink should be near one another so it will be easier for you to move if you will prepare food in the kitchen.

– A bathroom should be on the same floor as the kitchen, and there should be one and a half bathrooms for every two bedrooms. Ideally, a bathroom will be off the main bedroom.

– Flush all toilets to check them, and lift the cover off the tank to inspect whether the workings inside are working properly. Visit the highest bathroom in the house, turn all the faucets, and flush the toilet, to see if the water flows very slowly. Interior baths are better than those that have an outside wall, but they should have exhaust fans. Moreover, do not forget to check the ceilings below bathrooms for water stains.

– The fireplace should have an ash box, for ease of cleaning. Fireplace flooring should extend 18 inches in front, then one foot beyond each side of the fireplace. Check whether the damper is in good condition.

– The garage should slant down toward the outside, and it should have a window, along with a door besides the main door. An electrical outlet should also be available.

– Check the walls of the basement for cracks. Any crack one-third of an inch wide is not a good indication that the house is structurally well-built. A horizontal crack is worse than a vertical crack; it may signify that the wall is buckling.

– Look at the nails in the floorboards of the basement to see if they are rusty that can be a possible sign of flooding. And see whether the floor tiles have white stains at the joints, another sign of water damage. Freshly painted baseboard or basement walls could be a sign that the seller is trying to hide a water problem. Poke wood with a screwdriver; if it is soft, there may be termite damage.

– You should not have to walk through one bedroom to get to another. Any bedroom should have windows on two different walls for cross ventilation. Closets should have four feet of rod space per family member.

– In the attic, look for watermarks on the ceiling. A window or louvers should give ventilation. Six inches of insulation are desirable in the attic.